Political Views

Ana Aslan

Life History - Part 10

 

 

Titulescu
Titulescu
Ana
Ana
Ana in Coleta Hospital
Ana in Coleta Hospital

The two decades between the 2 World Wars were among the most important of modern Rumanian history. At this time, Rumania was considered as the California of Europe. The “Island of Latinity” which had survived 2 000 years, was glowing with intellectual power and freedom. In 1921, the first democratic constitution was introduced. Nicolai Titulescu, the Foreign Minister, was the designated President of the United Nations. He initiated “the small Atlantic Pact” from 1920 – 1921. Parts of Maldavia were given back to Rumania, after the Turks had relinquished them to Russia some time ago. Bucharest was called “Little Paris”, symphony orchestras and theatre productions were in constant demand, and the Rumanian medical centres became very famous. No wonder that colleagues from all over Europe visited Rumania. For some centuries, Rumania had been the buffer against Ottoman Empire for Western Europe. In Yalta, it was influenced by the Soviets, and for more than 40 years, had to live with the consequences.

 

Ana Aslan commented on these events from her point of view: “Of course the Russians left us Communism ….... after 1945, however, the Communists openly deceived Northern Maldavia and Northern Bukovina. They simply gave up the country without giving back the wealth or stolen treasures. I do not understand this political setup.”

 

During her time with Prof Danielopolou, she researched the vegetative nervous system of humans and animals. She was one of the first scientists to use the plethymographic method for researching the circulation. For 2 years, she worked on her PhD entitled “Cercertari privind inervatia vazomatoare la om”, translated: “The Contribution to researching the Nervous System.” Danielopolou with whom she had developed a friendly and very fruitful working relationship, assured her that the work was very interesting, and pointed out many theoretic and practical questions that could be connected to the theme and extended. In 1924, she defended her dissertation and received the title “Doctor of Medicine magna cum laude”. In spite of her success, she was not sure whether the medical journals would take the scientific articles of a woman seriously enough, and asked Danielopolou to sign as her co- author. A few months later, her articles appeared in a number of journals at the same time. She was overjoyed to see her name on paper for the first time under words for which she had fought so hard.

 

In 1923, Ana Aslan was a founder member of the “Hospital Association of Bucharest”. In 1928, of the “Society for Neuro Vegetative Physiology”. For her involvement in the medical community as well as her scientific works during the Thirties, she received the title of a Member of the “Rumanian Academy of Medicine” in 1936.

 

During the Second World War, Ana again cared for wounded soldiers and continued her research at the same time. As a doctor in her own practice, which she opened in her parent's home, she was well-liked, but did not have many patients. Prof Danielopolou explained that women preferred to be examined and treated by a man since they trusted men more. This is a fact which is difficult to appreciate from a modern point of view. Danielopolou further explained that men were forbidden by their wives for moral reasons to see a woman doctor with intimate bodily matters. The original disappointment about the lack of patients in her own practice disappeared as her other duties increased.

 

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